Chapter 6 Suggested Readings

United Nations Environment Programme. 2004. Analyzing Environmental Trends Using Satellite Data: Selected Cases. Division of Early Warning and Assessment (DEWA). United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi, Kenya.
Highly informative analyses of habitat change based on satellite imagery and detailed reports.

Ricketts, T. H., E. Dinerstein, D. M. Olson, C. J. Loucks, W. Eichbaum, D. DellaSala, K. Kavanagh, P. Hedao, P. T. Hurley, K. M. Carney, R. Abell, and S. Walters. 1999. Terrestrial Ecoregions of North America. A Conservation Assessment. Island Press, Washington, D.C.
Outstanding analysis of the status of ecoregional diversity in North America. Provides a complete introduction to the ecoregion concept, as well as an explanation of how conservation actions could serve to protect biodiversity.

Abell, R. A., D. M. Olson, E. Dinerstein, P. T. Hurley, J. T. Diggs, W. Eichbaum, S. Walters, W. Wettengel, T. Alllnutt, C. J. Loucks, and P. Hedao. 2000. Freshwater Ecoregions of North America. A Conservation Assessment. Island Press, Washington, D.C.
First assessment of freshwater ecosystems in North America, including priorities and an outline for conservation actions that could improve conservation of these regions.

Wilkramanayake, E., E. Dinerstein, C. J. Loucks, et al. 2001. Terrestrial Ecoregions of the Indo-Pacific. A Conservation Assessment. Island Press, Washington, D.C.
First detailed analysis of biodiversity in the Indo-Pacific Region, continuing work to identify conservation priorities on all continents.

Burgess, N., J. D’Amico Hayes, E. Underwood, E. Dinerstein, et al. 2004. Terrestrial Ecoregions of Africa and Madagascar. A Conservation Assessment. Island Press, Washington, D.C.
Comprehensive assessment of biodiversity in Africa and Madagascar, continuing work to identify conservation priorities on all continents.

Marsh, G. P. 2003 (Reprinting). Man and Nature. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
George Perkins Marsh’s original 1864 work was one of the first strong environmental analyses and warnings published. Marsh charged that ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean had brought about their own collapse by their abuse of the environment and warned the still young United States that the pace of environmental use could bring about the same destruction.

Cronon, W. 2003. Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England. Hill and Wang, New York.
Cronon describes the changes wrought by human cultures in New England before and following colonization by Europeans.

Cronon, W. 1992. Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West. W. W. Norton and Company, New York.
A stunning account of the ecological effects of Chicago on the entire central portion of the United States as it grew into a large city in the 1800s.

Fairhead, J. and M. Leach. 1996. Misreading the African Landscape: Society and Ecology in a Forest-Savanna Mosaic. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
An analysis that turns some theories of environmental degradation upside down by showing that forest islands resulted from stewardship of local cultures in a savannah landscape rather than being the remnants of destructive practices.

Colburn, T., D. Dumanoski, and J. P. Myers. 1996. Our Stolen Future: How we are Threatening our Fertility, Intelligence and Survival. Plume Press, New York.
Like Silent Spring, this book reached the public and brought the problems of endocrine disruptors into broad discussion.